The PMP principle and the Contest over Political Waves: Media Access for Oppositional Voices in the U.S. and Israel.

Citation:

Tamir Sheafer and Gadi Wolfsfeld. 2006. “The PMP principle and the Contest over Political Waves: Media Access for Oppositional Voices in the U.S. and Israel.” Conference Papers – American Political Science Association, Pp. 1. Publisher's Version

Abstract:

One of the primary questions in the field of political communication is the extent to which the news media in Western countries provide sufficient time and space for oppositional forces to be heard. The amount of access granted to oppositional forces varies among countries and it is useful to consider the variables that can explain such difference. The Politics-Media-Politics (PMP) principle claims that political variations lead to variations in media performance that then lead to changes in the political process. It is argued that one of the most important political variables influencing oppositional access is the nature of the nature of a country's party system. The party systems in Israel and the United States represent polar opposite systems in that Israel is a polarized multi-party system and the U.S. is a two party system. Data was collected based on news stories about major political waves that took place in the two countries during three different years. While opposition